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Author Topic: Pergo type floor install over concrete.......  (Read 6204 times)
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Don J in Minnesota
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« on: December 26, 2006, 07:37:11 PM »

My niece has asked me to install a Pergo type of floor in one room of the house she just bought. My question is do I need to put down a layer of plastic on the concrete before the felt paper or not? I don't see where there has been any moisture problems there.

Typical request started as can you help replace 7 doors (were painted white and wanted natural wood), then how about the trim also, and while at it Can we replace the wrought  iron banister with a wood one.

Hope we are done soon.

Thanks in advance
Don J
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Don J in Minnesota
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« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2006, 07:44:11 PM »

Don-
They make a special foam pad to put under the laminate flooring.  I made the mistake of using felt one time, and I don't recommend it.  The problem with felt is that the floor sticks to it when you step on the floor and then "lets go" as you walk away, and you can hear it.  I just installed about 450 sf of laminate flooring last month over the foam pad, and there is no comparison.  The foam has a built in moisture barrier.  The cost isn't really significant, and it beats felt hands down.
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dbarnett
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« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2006, 08:12:49 PM »

My wife and I had 3000 square feet of Pergo installed 2 years ago when we built our new home. The highly trained and qualified by Pergo installer checked on a new type of under underlayment for concrete. It was a dual purpose underlayment, (noise and sealer). About 8 months went by when we noticed our top of the line Pergo flooring was beginning to buckle and push out against the walls. Our entire bottom floor was useless and ugly. We called Pergo and the flooring installer and they both began scratching their heads. The final decision was that the underlayment was not up to snuff and enough moisture from the concrete had made the joints swell causing the floor to buckle and push against the walls.

Since Pergo authorized the underlayment and we had a factory trained installer, Pergo paid for the removal and re-installation of a new laminate floor. I still had to move all of the furniture, as I did not trust the low-bid movers to move our high priced furniture. This time there were some changes.

1. Buy some 6 mil painters plastic in the large rolls at one of the Borg's. This will be used directly on the concrete.
2. Put your noise underlayment on top of the 6 mil plastic.
3. You could also pay for a concrete sealer to be used before you put the 6 mil plastic down. ( I did even though Pergo stated that it would not be necessary). I was Paranoid.

If you have a moisture meter, anything above 4-5% is real bad. Pergo does not recommend installing a Pergo floor when moisture is above 5%. Basements are also a no-no.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2006, 08:15:30 PM by dbarnett » Logged

Dan - East San Diego County
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« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2006, 09:30:17 PM »

Most manufactuers do not recomend putting a layer of plastic down on top of concrete as well as most mold experts will not go along with this practice.  It is a trap more than a preventer.  It is widely done but it still goes back to the "good ol boy install".  Tape a piece of plastic down to the bare concrete floor and seal all sides with tape.  A 2' x2' piece of plastic will do.  If it doesn't sweat to death under the plastic,after a 24 hour period,then just use the two in one installers foam and tape all seams.  If it does sweat then seal the floor with a product like UGL's Masonry Drylock and LET IT CURE.  IMHO.  This is a recognized and certified install method and when checking with most manufactuers before doing so will provide for a full warranty intallation method. Fact.
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dbarnett
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« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2006, 10:15:15 PM »

Most manufactuers do not recomend putting a layer of plastic down on top of concrete as well as most mold experts will not go along with this practice.  It is a trap more than a preventer.  It is widely done but it still goes back to the "good ol boy install".  Tape a piece of plastic down to the bare concrete floor and seal all sides with tape.  A 2' x2' piece of plastic will do.  If it doesn't sweat to death under the plastic,after a 24 hour period,then just use the two in one installers foam and tape all seams.  If it does sweat then seal the floor with a product like UGL's Masonry Drylock and LET IT CURE.  IMHO.  This is a recognized and certified install method and when checking with most manufactuers before doing so will provide for a full warranty intallation method. Fact.


Jey TK,

Thanks for the additional input, as I am not a professional floor installer. I should have stated more clearly that the moisture meter was used over a week period. Pergo sent a certified independent insepctor for the warranty claim. The warranty claim was sent to Pergo and the customer service /warranty people instructed our installer to use the 6 mil plastic. It seems that there was milling problems that caused some of the joint swelling, but they still insisted on us using the floor sealer OR the plastic. I chose both. Maybe the 7-11 inches of rain we average each year in San Diego, is one of the reasons why we can get away with the plastic? Just curious.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2006, 10:17:42 PM by dbarnett » Logged

Dan - East San Diego County
Don J in Minnesota
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« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2006, 09:56:02 PM »

Thanks for the advice. I'll give the plastic a try this weekend and see what happens.
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Don J in Minnesota
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« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2006, 12:42:46 AM »

use the recommended underlayment or you will regret it.  My Pergo floor had plastic down directly on the concrete (use some 3M spray adhesive to hold it in place if it moves around), then it had the paper style padding on top of that, mine was the glue together stuff, new stuff is a green foam about 1/8" thick.

The underlayment acts as a vapor barrier and it seals the moisture in the concrete (there is always moisture in concrete).  It also acts as a sound deadener when you walk on the floor, the floor is warmer and much better with the underlayment.

No place to cut corners or cost, use the correct stuff for the floor you are installing.

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